Home » George Harrison’s Revelation: How This Album Exposed John Lennon’s Deeper Struggles

George Harrison’s Revelation: How This Album Exposed John Lennon’s Deeper Struggles

John Lennon and George Harrison experimented with LSD on multiple occasions, and Harrison observed that this altered the dynamics of their relationship. He expressed that it provided him with a deeper insight into his bandmate, believing that the psychedelic experiences might have unearthed some of Lennon’s unresolved childhood traumas. As Lennon continued to explore acid use and released an album in 1970, Harrison came to the realization that his bandmate grappled with more profound issues than he initially perceived.

Musical Revelations: How an Album Provided George Harrison with Insight into John Lennon’s Mind

During Lennon’s childhood, his parents went through a separation, leading to him moving in with his aunt after his mother was reported to child services. This incident created a distance between Lennon and his mother. When they finally started rebuilding their relationship, Lennon’s mother tragically passed away.

Lennon discussed the profound loss of his mother with Paul McCartney, who shared a similar experience. It was through frequent LSD use that George Harrison began to grasp the profound impact of Lennon’s tumultuous childhood.

“In a way, like psychiatry, acid could undo a lot—it was so powerful that you could just see. But I don’t think we fully grasped the extent of how messed up John was,” Harrison revealed in The Beatles Anthology. “For example, you wouldn’t think he could become bitter, given his friendly and loving nature; but he also had the capacity to be quite nasty and cutting.”

In 1970, Lennon unveiled “John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band,” a work inspired by his experiences with primal scream therapy alongside Arthur Janov. Within this album, he delved into his childhood abandonment issues. Upon hearing it, Harrison expressed that he gained a more profound insight into Lennon’s early years.

“As a kid, I didn’t connect the dots, thinking, ‘Oh, it’s because his dad left home and his mother died,’ even though, in reality, those events probably left an indelible scar,” Harrison reflected. “It wasn’t until he crafted that album centered around Janov and primal screaming that I realized he was dealing with even more deep-seated issues than I had initially thought.”

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LSD’s Impact: How George Harrison Altered His Bond with John Lennon

Harrison and Lennon embraced a more liberal use of acid compared to McCartney and Ringo Starr, a choice that, according to Harrison, forged a deeper connection between them. “After experiencing acid together, John and I developed a fascinating relationship,” Harrison explained. “Any sense of me being younger or smaller was no longer a source of embarrassment with John. Paul may still say, ‘I suppose we looked down on George because he was younger,’ but that’s a misconception people harbor. It’s not about your age or physical stature. It’s about your higher consciousness and your ability to harmonize with the essence of creation.”

This newfound connection made Harrison feel closer to Lennon than to the other Beatles. “John and I spent a significant amount of time together thereafter, and I felt a stronger bond with him than with the others, right up until his passing,” Harrison revealed. “As Yoko entered the picture, my personal contact with John diminished, but during the occasional encounters, just by the look in his eyes, I sensed that we were connected.”

John Lennon Discusses His Experience with LSD

Lennon claimed to have indulged in LSD approximately 1000 times during his lifetime, although Harrison expressed skepticism about this assertion. According to Lennon, the drug played a role in breaking down his ego. “I received a message on acid that urged me to destroy my ego, and I did just that,” Lennon recalled. “I was immersed in that Leary nonsense [referring to Timothy Leary’s book ‘The Psychedelic Experience’], going through the motions like everyone else, and I dismantled myself. I obliterated my ego, felt like I couldn’t achieve anything, allowed people to say and do as they pleased, and I was reduced to nothing; I was worthless.” However, with the support of Beatles press officer Derek Taylor and Yoko Ono, Lennon managed to reconstruct his sense of self. “That was the turning point. I began to fight again, reclaiming my voice and asserting, ‘Well, I can do this,’ and ‘Screw you, this is what I want. I want it, and don’t put me down.

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