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Paul McCartney’s Affection for a Beatles B-Side Ballad

Overlooked Gems: Paul McCartney Applauds a Beatles B-Side, While John Lennon Disagrees. Despite being among The Beatles’ finest creations, some of their songs go unnoticed by both fans and the general public. Paul McCartney, in particular, highlighted the excellence of one of the band’s B-sides, deeming it “very fine.” According to McCartney, this particular song challenged a stereotype surrounding John Lennon’s songwriting. However, John had a different perspective, dismissing the tune as a subpar rehash of one of The Fab Four’s earlier tracks.

Paul McCartney Attributes a Fantastic Beatles B-Side to John Lennon’s ‘Inspiration’

In his 1997 book, “Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now,” Paul recounted the inception of The Beatles’ “Yes It Is.” “I was there writing it with John, but it was his inspiration that I helped him finish off,” Paul shared. This poignant ballad is best recognized as the B-side to “Ticket to Ride.”

Reflecting on the song, Paul praised it as a “very fine song of John’s, a ballad, unusual for John.” Despite being less known for ballads, John crafted several beautiful ones for The Beatles, including “If I Fell,” “Julia,” “Good Night,” “In My Life,” and “Across the Universe.”

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Paul McCartney Explores the Internal Dynamics of The Beatles During That Period

Paul reminisced about the state of the Lennon-McCartney songwriting partnership during the creation of “Yes It Is.” “The interesting thing is that we actually come out rather equal, the more you analyze it, the more you get to the feeling that both of us always had, which was one of equality,” he reflected. “I don’t think John ever felt he was better than me, and I don’t think I ever felt I was better than John.

“Certainly, when we worked, it would have been fatal in a collaboration for either of us to ever think that,” he continued. “It was just that I brought a certain 50%, and John brought a certain 50%.”

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John Lennon Perceived the Song as a Remake of Another B-Side

While Paul McCartney praised “Yes It Is,” John Lennon held a different opinion. In the 1980 interview documented in the book “All We Are Saying: The Last Major Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono,” John expressed, “That’s me trying a rewrite of ‘This Boy,’ but it didn’t work.” “This Boy” served as the B-side to “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and stands out as one of The Beatles’ rare doo-wop songs. Despite its mid-tempo nature, it’s a departure from being slow, and the band even released an instrumental version titled “Ringo’s Theme (This Boy).”

In contrast, “Yes It Is” leans more towards a soft-rock ballad rather than a doo-wop piece. It exhibits a slower pace than “This Boy” and carries a quality that could have suited the repertoire of crooners like Elvis Presley or Frank Sinatra. While John perceived “Yes It Is” as a rewrite of “This Boy,” it’s unlikely others would make that connection. Despite the dismissal from the “Whatever Gets You Through the Night” singer, “Yes It Is” remains intriguing for its departure from the typical Lennon style, standing as one of The Fab Four’s many hidden gems.

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